Taking the Guessing Game Out of Telehealth

Center for Connected Health Policy 2018

CCHP is a non-profit organization that helps lawmakers and healthcare officials understand the laws and policies around telehealth.

Role
  • Led UX Strategy
  • Led UX Design
  • Created interactive prototypes
  • Created documentation for development
  • Guided visual design
TEAM

Patrick Ford (Senior Product Designer/Co-Founder of Marker Seven)
Scott Abbott (Creative Director)
Jon Betts (Front-End Developer)
Jeremy Amos (Back-End Developer)

Overview

The Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) specializes in educating people about telehealth. They are a national resource for health professionals, law makers, politicians, and everyday citizens. During the full redesign of their website, their major focus was on creating an interactive map to filter laws by state and other criteria.

UX Documentation

Use Cases
User stories
Content Gap Analysis

Challenges

Two Areas to Select

One of CCHP’s non negotiables was to have a visual display of the map where users could click on a state. They also wanted the ability to choose a state via dropdown. With two ways to select a state, this created an interesting challenge on how to make it apparent to the user that they could select from either option. The solution was to have the other option autofill once one was selected.

Search Results that Needed Context

Displaying search results was tricky because there were 3 categories a user could search by. If they just searched by one of the categories, it wouldn’t be helpful unless it was given in the context of the other two categories. (For example, a user could search by definitions, but it wouldn’t be very helpful unless the user knew what sub-category the definition was for and what state it applied to.) The solution was to create a visual hierarchy within the results so that one could always see the tie between state, category, and topic.

Lengthy Search Results

CCHP wanted the ability for users to filter by a specific category or topic without having to choose a specific state. This created the challenge of having so many results that it would become overwhelming. In the case that a user does not choose a specific state, each state’s results are hidden under an accordion. If a specific state is clicked on, that accordion expands.